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02 2020




Pope Francis Holy Mass Bali - Love your Enemies  23.02.20 

Retaliation

If someone thinks badly of me, if someone hurts me, why can I not repay him with the same currency? “No”, says Jesus. Nonviolence. No act of violence. 
Our Father, continues to love everyone, even when his love is not reciprocated. If we want to be disciples of Christ, if we want to call ourselves Christians, this is the only way; there is no other. Having been loved by God, we are called to love in return; having been forgiven, we are called to forgive; having been touched by love, we are called to love without waiting for others to love first; having been saved graciously, we are called to seek no benefit from the good we do. 
Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.  
He asks of us the extremism of charity. This is the only legitimate kind of Christian extremism: the extremism of love. 
Love your enemies. We do well today, at Mass and afterwards, to repeat these words to ourselves and apply them to those who treat us badly, who annoy us, whom we find hard to accept, who trouble our serenity. 
For those who love God have no enemies in their hearts.  
The worship of God is contrary to the culture of hatred. And the culture of hatred is fought by combatting the cult of complaint. How many times do we complain about the things that we lack, about the things that go wrong! Jesus knows about all the things that don’t work. He knows that there is always going to be someone who dislikes us. Or someone who makes our life miserable. All he asks us to do is pray and love. 
Evil can only be conquered by goodness. Ask God for the strength to love.




Pope Francis  General Audience 19.02.20 Beatitudes - Blessed are the meek  

Meekness

In today's catechesis, we face the third of the eight Beatitudes of Matthew's Gospel: "Blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the earth"(Mt 5:5). 

The term "meek" used here means literally sweet, meek, gentle, free of violence. Meekness manifests itself in moments of conflict, you can see from how one reacts to a hostile situation. Anyone may seem meek when everything is quiet, but how does one react "under pressure" if he is attacked, offended, assaulted.

In Scripture the word "meek" also indicates the one who has no land ownership; and so it strikes us that the third Beatitude says precisely that the meek will inherit the earth. 

The meek is not an accommodating person but is the disciple of Christ who has learned to defend much more than land. He defends his peace, he defends his relationship with God, he defends his gifts, the gifts of God, keeping mercy, fraternity, trust, hope. Because meek people are merciful, fraternal, confident, and hopeful people. 

The "land" to be conquered with meekness is the salvation of the brother of whom Matthew's Gospel speaks: "If he listens to you, you will have won over brother"(Mt 18:15). There is no land more beautiful  than the heart of others, there is no more beautiful territory to gain than the peace found with a brother. And that is the land to be inherited with meekness! 



Pope Francis  General Audience 12.02.20 Beatitudes - Those who Weep

Tears


Blessed are those who weep, because they will be comforted (Matthew 5:4). 
This weeping, in the scriptures, can have two aspects: the first is for someone's death or suffering. 
Mourning is a bitter road, but it can be useful to open our eyes to the life and sacred and irreplaceable value of each person, and at that moment one realizes how short the time is.
The other aspect is tears for sin – for one's own sin – when the heart bleeds in the pain of having offended God and our neighbour. 
One of the first monks, Efrem the Syrian says that a face washed by tears is unspeakably beautiful. The beauty of repentance, the beauty of crying, the beauty of contrition! God always forgives: let us not forget this. God always forgives, even the ugliest sins, always. The problem is within us, that we get tired of asking for forgiveness. God "does not treat us according to our sins and does not repay us according to our faults"(Psalm 103:10).




Pope Francis Angelus 09.02.20 

Light


Matthew 5:13-16, Jesus says to his disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. You are the light of the world."
Salt. The disciple is therefore called to keep society away from  the dangers, and the corrosive elements that pollute people's lives. It is a question of resisting sin and moral degradation, and bearing witness to the values of honesty and fraternity, without giving in to the worldly enticements of careerism, power and wealth.  
Light. Jesus is the light that has dispelled the darkness, but it still remains in the world and in individual people. It is the task of the Christian to dispel it further by making Christ's light shine among others and by proclaiming His Gospel. This outpouring of light can come from our words, but it must come mainly from our 'good deeds'.  
Jesus invites us not to be afraid to live in the world, even if there are sometimes conditions of conflict and sin in it. In the face of violence, injustice and oppression, Christians cannot shut up within themselves in or hide in the security of their own enclosure; even the Church cannot shut up within herself, she cannot abandon her mission of evangelization and service.