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Pope Francis  General Audience 05.08.20

To Heal the World

Yesterday in Beirut, near the port, there were massive explosions causing dozens of deaths, wounding thousands and causing serious destruction. Let us pray for the victims, for their families; and let us pray for Lebanon so that, through the dedication of all its social, political and religious elements, it might face this extremely tragic and painful moment and, with the help of the international community, overcome the grave crisis they are experiencing.



Pope Francis August 2020

The Maritime World


The life of sailors or fishermen and their families is very difficult.
Sometimes they are victims of forced labour or are left behind in distant ports.
The competition of industrial fishing and the problem of pollution make their work even more complicated.
Without the people of the sea, many parts of the world would starve.

Let us pray for all those who work and live from the sea, among them sailors, fishermen and their families.



Pope Francis Angelus 02.08.20

What does Providence offer us to share?

Pope Francis What does Providence offer us to share? 02.08.20 Angelus
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above
This Sunday’s Gospel presents to us the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves (see Mt 14,13-21). The scene takes place in a deserted place, where Jesus had retired with His disciples. But the people found Him so as to listen to Him and to be healed: indeed, His words and His gestures restore and bring hope. At sundown, the crowd was still present and the disciples, practical men, invited Jesus to send them away so that they could go and find something to eat. But He answered: “You give them something to eat” (v. 16). We can imagine the disciples’ faces! Jesus was well aware of what He was about to do, but He wanted to change their attitude: not to say, “send them away,” “let them fend for themselves”, “let them find something to eat”, but rather, “what does Providence offer us to share?” These are two opposite ways of behaving. And Jesus wants to bring them to the second way of behaving because the first proposal is that of the practical person, but is not generous: “send them away so they can go and find, let them fend for themselves.” Jesus thinks another way. Jesus wants to use this situation to educate His friends, both then and now, about God’s logic. And what is God’s logic that we see here? The logic of taking responsibility for others. The logic of not washing one’s hands, the logic of not looking the other way. No. The logic of taking responsibility for others. That “let them fend for themselves” should not enter into the Christian vocabulary.

As soon as one of the Twelve says, realistically, “We have here only five loaves of bread and two fish”, Jesus answers, “Bring them here to me” (vv. 17-18). He takes the food in His hands, raises His eyes heavenward, recites the blessing and begins to break it and give the pieces to the disciples to hand out. And those loaves and fish did not run out; there was enough, and plenty left over for thousands of people.

With this gesture, Jesus demonstrates His power; not in a spectacular way but as a sign of charity, of God the Father’s generosity toward His weary and needy children. He is immersed in the life of His people, He understands their fatigue and their limitations, but He does not allow anyone to be lost, or to lose out: He nourishes them with His word and provides food in plenty for sustenance.
In this Gospel passage we can perceive a reference to the Eucharist, especially in the description of the blessing, the breaking of the bread, delivery to the disciples, and distribution to the people (v. 19). It is noteworthy how close the link is between the Eucharistic bread, nourishment for eternal life, and daily bread, necessary for earthly life. Before offering Himself to the Father as the Bread of salvation, Jesus ensures there is food for those who follow Him and who, in order to be with Him, forgot to make provisions. At times the spiritual and the material are in opposition, but in reality spiritualism, like materialism, is alien to the Bible. It is not biblical language.

The compassion and tenderness that Jesus showed towards the crowds is not sentimentality, but rather the concrete manifestation of the love that cares for the people’s needs. And we are called to approach the Eucharistic table with these same attitudes of Jesus: compassion for the needs of others, this word that is repeated in the Gospel when Jesus sees a problem, an illness or these people without food… “He had compassion.” “He had compassion”.

Compassion is not a purely material feeling; true compassion is patire con [to suffer with], to take others’ sorrows on ourselves. Perhaps it would do us good today to ask ourselves: Do I feel compassion when I read news about war, about hunger, about the pandemic? So many things… Do I feel compassion toward those people? Do I feel compassion toward the people who are near to me? Am I capable of suffering with them, or do I look the other way, or “they can fend for themselves”? Let us not forget this word “compassion,” which is trust in the provident love of the Father, and means courageous sharing.

May Mary Most Holy help us to walk the path that the Lord shows us in today's Gospel. It is the journey of fraternity, which is essential in order to face the poverty and suffering of this world, especially in this tragic moment, and which projects us beyond the world itself, because it is a journey that begins with God and returns to God.









Mass Casa Santa Marta











Pope Francis - Christ is Alive! 

Pope Francis - Christ is Alive

Christ is alive! He is our hope, and in a wonderful way he brings youth to our world, and everything he touches becomes young, new, full of life. The very first words, then, that I would like to say to every young Christian are these: Christ is alive and he wants you to be alive.

 

Pope Francis


100 inspiring Quotes from Pope Francis listed in Subject order with the date and occasion when the quote was made

Pope Francis General Audience 05.08.20

To Heal the World

Pope Francis To heal the world 05.08.20 General Audience
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

The pandemic continues to cause deep wounds, exposing our vulnerability. On every continent there are many who have died, many are ill. Many people and many families are living a time of uncertainty because of socio-economic problems which especially affect the poorest.

Thus, we must keep our gaze firmly fixed on Jesus: in the midst of this pandemic, our eyes on Jesus; and with this faith embrace the hope of the Kingdom of God that Jesus Himself brings us. A Kingdom of healing and of salvation that is already present in our midst. A Kingdom of justice and of peace that is manifested through works of charity, which in their turn increase hope and strengthen faith. Within the Christian tradition, faith, hope and charity are much more than feelings or attitudes. They are virtues infused in us through the grace of the Holy Spirit: gifts that heal us and that make us healers, gifts that open us to new horizons, even while we are navigating the difficult waters of our time.
Renewed contact with the Gospel of faith, of hope and of love invites us to assume a creative and renewed spirit. In this way, we will be able to transform the roots of our physical, spiritual and social infirmities and the destructive practices that separate us from each other, threatening the human family and our planet.

Jesus’s ministry offers many examples of healing: when He heals those affected by fever, by leprosy, by paralysis; when He restores sight, speech or hearing. In reality, He heals not only the physical evil – which is true, physical evil – but He heals the entire person. In that way, He restores the person back to the community also, healed; He liberates the person from isolation because He has healed him or her.

Let’s think of the beautiful account of the healing of the paralytic at Capernaum (see Mk 2:1-12) that we heard at the beginning of the audience. While Jesus is preaching at the entrance to the house, four men bring their paralyzed friend to Jesus. Not being able to enter because there was such a great crowd there, they make a hole in the roof and let the stretcher down in front of Him. Jesus who was preaching sees this stretcher coming down in front of Him. “When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, ‘Child, your sins are forgiven’ ” (v. 5). And then, as a visible sign, He adds: “Rise, pick up your mat, and go home” (v. 11).

What a wonderful example of healing! Christ’s action is a direct response to the faith of those people, to the hope they put in Him, to the love they show that they have for each other. And so, Jesus heals, but He does not simply heal the paralysis. Jesus heals everyone, He forgives sins, He renews the life of the paralyzed man and his friend. He makes him born again, let’s say it that way. It is a physical and spiritual healing, all together, the fruit of personal and social contact. Let’s imagine how this friendship, and the faith of all those present in that house, would have grown thanks to Jesus’s action, that healing encounter with Jesus!

And so we can ask ourselves: today, in what way can we help heal our world? As disciples of the Lord Jesus, who is the physician of our souls and bodies, we are called to continue “His work, work of healing and salvation” in a physical, social and spiritual sense.

Although the Church administers Christ’s healing grace through the Sacraments, and although she provides healthcare services in the remotest corners of the planet, she is not an expert in the prevention or the cure of the pandemic. She helps with the sick, but she is not an expert. Neither does she give specific socio-political pointers. This is the job of political and social leaders. Nevertheless, over the centuries, and by the light of the Gospel, the Church has developed several social principles which are fundamental, principles that can help us move forward in preparing the future that we need. I cite the main ones which are closely connected: the principle of the dignity of the person, the principle of the common good, the principle of the preferential option for the poor, the principle of the universal destination of goods, the principle of the solidarity, of subsidiarity, the principle of the care for our common home. These principles help the leaders, those responsible for society, to foster growth and also, as in the case of the pandemic, the healing of the personal and social fabric. All of these principles express in different ways the virtues of faith, hope and love.

In the next few weeks, I invite you to tackle together the pressing questions that the pandemic has brought to the fore, social ills above all. And we will do it in the light of the Gospel, of the theological virtues and of the principles of the Church’s social doctrine. We will explore together how our Catholic social tradition can help the human family heal this world that suffers from serious illnesses. It is my desire that everyone reflect and work together, as followers of Jesus who heals, to construct a better world, full of hope for future generations. Thank you.


Laudato Si' Anniversary Year

24 May 2020 to 24 May 2021

All of us can co-operate as instruments of God for the care of creation, each according to his or her own culture, experience,  involvements and talents.

https://sites.google.com/site/francishomilies/home/Laudato%20Si%20Year%205.jpg

Today is the fifth anniversary of the encyclical Laudato Si', with which we tried to draw attention to the cry of the Earth and the poor. Thanks to the initiative of the Department for the Service of Integral Human Development, the "Laudato week" that we have just celebrated, will blossom into a special anniversary year of Laudato Si', a special year to reflect on the encyclical, from May 24 of this year until May 24 of next year. I invite all people of good will to join in, and to take care of our common home and our frail brothers and sisters.


Subject Index
of Homilies


The Gospel in your pocket 

Read the Gospel

How do we receive the Word of God? The response is clear: As one receives Jesus Christ. The Church tells us that Jesus is present in the Scripture, in His Word.
Always carry a small Gospel with you in your purse, in your pocket, and read a passage from the Gospel during the day. Not so much to learn something, but mostly to find Jesus, because Jesus actually is in His Word, in His Gospel.  Every time I read the Gospel, I find Jesus.  - Pope Francis 01.09.14
 
Daily Readings - read the entire New Testament over a 2 year period (reading plan courtesy of Gideon International)


Pope Francis   World Day of Migrants and Refugees  27.09.20  

Forced like Jesus Christ to Flee 

Listen to the plea of the vulnerable, the displaced and our seriously ill planet. Listening gives us an opportunity to be reconciled with our neighbour, with all those who have been “discarded”, with ourselves and with God, who never tires of offering us his mercy.
Towards WDMR2020 22.07.20




Pope Francis Holy Mass Casa Santa Marta 08.07.20  

Spiritual Communion: 
My Jesus, I believe that You are truly present in the Holy Sacrament. I love You above all things and I desire to receive You into my soul. Because I cannot at this moment receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as being already there and unite myself wholly to You. Never permit me to be separated from You. Amen.


Pope Francis Mass at Casa Santa Marta 08.07.20

The Lord’s face  

Pope Francis The Lord’s face 08.07.20
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

The Responsorial Psalm invites us always to seek the Lord’s face: “Seek the Lord and his strength; seek his presence continually” (Ps 105:4). This quest is fundamental for the life of every believer, for we have come to realize that our ultimate goal in life is the encounter with God.

To seek the face of God is an assurance that our journey through this world will end well. It is an exodus towards the Promised Land, our heavenly home. The face of God is our destination and the guiding star that helps us not to lose our way.

The people of Israel, as described by the prophet Hosea in the first reading (cf. 10:1-3.7-8.12), had gone astray. They had lost sight of the Promised Land and were wandering in the desert of iniquity. Abundance, prosperity and wealth had caused their hearts to drift away from the Lord and had filled them instead with falsehood and injustice.

We too, as Christians today, are not immune to this sin. “The culture of comfort, which makes us think only of ourselves, makes us insensitive to the cries of other people, makes us live in soap bubbles which, however lovely, are insubstantial; they offer a fleeting and empty illusion which results in indifference to others; indeed, it even leads to the globalization of indifference. In this globalized world, we have fallen into globalized indifference. We have become used to the suffering of others: it doesn’t affect me; it doesn’t concern me; it’s none of my business!”
 
Hosea’s words reach us today as a renewed summons to conversion, a call to turn our eyes to the Lord and recognize his face.

Our efforts to seek the face of God are born of the desire for an encounter with the Lord, a personal encounter, an encounter with his immense love, with his saving power. The twelve apostles described in today’s Gospel (cf. Mt 10:1-7) received the grace to encounter him physically in Jesus Christ, the incarnate Son of God.

The personal encounter with the Lord, a time of grace and salvation, entails a mission: “As you go”, Jesus tells them, proclaim the good news: ‘The kingdom of heaven is at hand’” (v. 7). Encounter and mission must not be separated.

This kind of personal encounter with Jesus Christ is possible also for us, who are the disciples of the third millennium. In our effort to seek the Lord’s face, we can recognize him in the face of the poor, the sick, the abandoned, and the foreigners whom God places on our way. This encounter becomes also for us a time of grace and salvation, and summons us to the same mission entrusted to the Apostles.

Today marks the seventh year, the seventh anniversary of my visit to Lampedusa. In the light of God’s word, I would like to repeat what I said to those taking part in the meeting “Free from Fear” in February last year: “The encounter with the other is also an encounter with Christ. He himself told us this. He is the one knocking on our door, hungry, thirsty, naked, sick, imprisoned; he is the one seeking an encounter with us, asking our help, asking to come ashore. And lest we have any doubt, he tells us categorically: ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did to one of the least of these my brethren, you did to me’” (Mt 25:40).

“Whatever you did...” for better or for worse! This admonition is all the more timely today. We ought to use it as a basic starting point for our daily examination of conscience. Here I think of Libya, detention camps, the abuses and violence to which migrants are subjected; I think of journeys of hope, rescue operations, and cases of rejection. “Whatever you did… you did to me.”

I remember that day, seven years ago, in the very south of Europe, on that island… A number of people told me their stories and all that they had gone through to get there. There were interpreters present. One person was telling me about terrible things in his language, and the interpreter seemed to translate well. There was a lady; she understood the language and she had seen our conversation on television. She said this to me. “Listen, what the Ethiopian translator told you is not even a quarter of the torture and suffering that those people experienced”. They gave me the “distilled” version. This is what is happening today with Libya: they are giving us a “distilled version”. The war is indeed horrible, we know that, but you cannot imagine the hell that people are living there, in that detention camp. And those people came only with hope of crossing the sea.

May the Virgin Mary, Solacium migrantium, “Solace of Migrants”, help us discover the face of her Son in all our brothers and sisters forced to flee their homeland because of the many injustices that continue to afflict our world.








 AE 

Abortion

Accusers

Acts of mercy

Adultery

Advent

Adversary

Afraid

Agreement

All Nations

All Saints

All Souls

Alone

Always beside us

Anger

Annoyed

Annunciation of the Lord

Anointing

antichrist

Anxiety

Apostle

Apostolic zeal

Arrogance

Ascension

Ash Wednesday

Ashamed

Ask

Asylum seekers

Authority 

Bad Times

Baptism

Baptism of the Lord

Beatitudes

Beauty

Belittling

Belonging

Betrayal

Birth of Jesus

Bishops

Black

Bleakest moments

Bless

Body and Blood

Born Christians

Broadmindedness

Building

Bullying

Burdens

Busy 

Call to Holiness - Gaudete Exsultate

Canonization

Care

Care for our common home / Laudato Si / Climate Change

Careers

Catechists

Catechumen

Catholic

 Celebration

Change your Life

Charity

Choices in Life

Chrism Mass

Christ the King

Christian community

Christian Life

Christian Unity

Christian vigilance

Christian Witness

Christianity as a social habit

Christians of action and truth

Christians of words

Christmas

Church

Cleaner

Clerical attitude

Closed door Church

Closeness

Come out of ourselves

Comfort

Commandments

Communion

Comparison to others constantly

Compassion

Complaining

Concreteness

Condemnation

Confession

Confirmation

Conflict

Confraternities

Conscience

Consecrated Life

Consolation

Consumerism

Consumption

Contemplative Prayer

Contempt

Conversion

Corpus Christie

Correction

Corruption

Courage

Covenant

Cowardice

Creation

Crisis

Cross

Crucifix

Cry Out

Culture of Waste

Cursing


Dark Times

Darkness

Deacons

Death

Deception

Deeds

Defeat

Defending ourselves

Demons

Desires

Desolation

Despair

Destruction

Devastation

Devil

Dictatorial Governments

Difficulties

Disabled

Disappointment

Discarding

Discernment

Disciple

Discouraged

Discrediting

Disdain

Distances

Disunity

Division

Docility

Drugs 

Easter

Ecclesial spirit

Economics

Ecumenism

Elderly

Encounter with Jesus

End of the world

Endurance

Enemies

Environment

Envy

Epiphany

Ethics

Eucharist

Evangelical spirit

Evangelization

Everyone

Evil

Exorcism

Exploitation

J 

Face of God

 Failures

Faith

Faithfulness

False accusation

False News

Fame

Family

Fasting

Fat

Father

Fear

First Communicants

Flattery

Flee from God

Following

Forbear

Forgiveness

the Forgotten

Fortune telling

Fraternity

Freedom

Future

 Gardener

Generosity

Gentleness

Give freely

Give Thanks to God

Go out

God calls

Godliness

God Remembers You

God's Gratuitousness

God's Love

God's Patience

God's Power and Weakness

God's True Face

God's Voice

God walks with us

Good

Good Deeds

Good Friday

Good Samaritan

Good Shepherd

Gossip

Government

Grace

Greatest

Grey

Grief

Guardian Angels

Harmony 

Hatred

Heal this wound

Healing

Healthy Restlessness

Hear the voice of God

Heart of stone

our Heart

Heaven

Hell

Help me

Help one another

Holiness

Holy Family

Holy Saturday

Holy Spirit

Holy Thursday

Holy Wednesday

Holy Week

Homeless

Hope

Hospitality

How to know God

Human Fraternity

Human Trafficking

Humiliation

Humility

Hungry

Hypocrisy of the just

Hypocrites

Idle 

Idols

Impatient

the Important

Indifference

Indignation

In my name

Insecurity

Insults

Jealousy

Jesus Christ

Journeying

Joy

Joy of the Gospel/ Evangelii Gaudium

Judas

Judging

Justice 

 Killing

Kindness

Kingdom of God

Lamentations

Last Judgement

Laudato Si

the Law

Lazarus

Lazy

Leaders

the Least Ones

Leave something

Lent

Liberation

Lies

Life

Light

Listen to the word of Jesus

Littleness

Living stones

Lord's Supper

Lost Faith

Lost sheep

Love

Love God

Love in the Family - Amoris Laetitia

Love of God

Love our neighbour

Lukewarm Christians

Lumen Fidei /The light of Faith 

Lust

Luxury

 

 Magnanimity

Marginalized

Marriage

Martyrs

Mary

Mass of the Lord's Supper

Material things

Mediocrity

Meekness

Memory

Mercy

Migrants

Ministry

Miracles

Misinformation

Mission

Missionary spirit

Mistreat

Mock

Moments of Desolation

Money

Mourning

Mud-slinging

Murmuring

My Image

My Lifestyle


Nativity Scene

Near to people

Neighbour

New life

Newness

New things of God

Night of the sinner

Nostalgia

Not speaking

 

Obey God

Omission

Open door Church

Oppressed

Our Lady 

Overwhelmed

 S T

Pagan worship

Palm Sunday - Passion of the Lord

Past

Pastors

Pastoral Customs Office

Path of Life

Patience

Peace

Pentecost / Whitsunday

People of God

Persecution

Perseverance

Personal success

Pessimism

Pleasure

Politics

Poor

Poor in Spirit

Possessions

Power

Prayer

Present

Presentation of the Lord

Pride

Priests

Prince of the World

Prisoners

Privilege

Problems

Proclaim the Gospel

Proclamation 

Prodigal Son

Professing

Profession of Faith

Profit

Promotion

Prophecy

Prophet

Prostitutes

Protect

 

Read the Gospel

Reassurance 

Receiving

Reconciliation

Refugees

Refusing Jesus

Regret

Remain

Remain steadfast in the Lord

Remember

Renewal

Repent

Resentment

Respect

Resurrection

Retaliation

Return to God

Revenge

Riches

Ridicule

Rifts

Righteousness

Rigid Christians

Rivalry

Ruins of Life

Rule for Daily Life

Rulers


Sacred Heart

Sadness

Saint

Salt

Salvation

Sanctification

Satan

Scorn

Seduction

See the Good

Seeking God

Self-importance

Self-justification 

Selfish

Separation

Serenity

Service

Setbacks

Settle the matter

Shame

Sharing

Shouting

Sick

Silence

Simplicity

Sin

Slander

Slavery

Smallness

Smiling

Something Stupid

Son

Soul

St John

St Joseph

St Mark

St Paul

St Peter

St Stephen

Stifling Life

Stop and Choose

Strength

Struggle

Success

Suffering

Surprises

Swearing

Swim against the tide

Take life as it comes

Talents

Talk to the Lord

Tarot cards

Tears

Temple

Temptations 

Tenderness

Thank You

Thoughts

Time

Today

Tragedies

Transfiguration

Trials of Life

Treasure

Trinity

Triumphalism

Troubles

Trust in God

Truth

 XY Z 

Urbi et Orbi

 Uncertainty

Unemployed

Unity

Vanity

Verbal abuse

Victims

Victory

Vigilance

Violence 

Wants

Wars

Weakest

Weakness

Wealth

Weary

Weeping

Welcoming

Well-being

Witness

 Women

Word of God

Words

Work

Works of charity

Works of mercy

World institutions

Worldliness

Worship

Worries

Wounds

Wrongdoing endured

 

Young people