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Pope Francis Angelus 24.01.21


This Sunday is dedicated to the Word of God. One of the great gifts of our time is the rediscovery of Sacred Scripture in the life of the Church at all levels. Never before has the Bible been accessible to everyone: in all languages and now also in audio-visual and digital formats. St Jerome, whose 16th centenary death I recently recalled, says that those who ignore Scripture ignore Christ.
And vice versa it is Jesus Christ, the Word made flesh, dead and risen, who opens our minds to understanding the Scriptures (cf. Lk 24:45). This is particularly the case in the Liturgy, but also when we pray alone or in groups, especially with the Gospel and the Psalms. I thank and encourage parishes for their constant commitment to educate them to listen to the Word of God. May we never lack the joy of sowing the Gospel! And I repeat myself another time: we have a habit, have the habit of always carrying a small Gospel in your pocket, in your bag, so that you can read it during the day, at least three, four verses. The Gospel always with us.

Homeless

On 20 January, just metres from St Peter's Square, a 46-year-old Nigerian homeless man named Edwin was found dead from the cold weather. His story is in addition to that of so many other homeless people who recently died in Rome under the same tragic circumstances. Let's pray for Edwin. Let us be admonished by what St Gregory the Great said, who, in the face of death of a beggar in the cold, said that Mass would not be celebrated that day because it was like Good Friday. Let's think about Edwin. Let's think about what this man, 46, felt in the cold, ignored by everyone, abandoned, even by us. Let us pray for him.
Tomorrow afternoon, in the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls, we will celebrate the Vespers for the Feast of the Conversion of Saint Paul, at the end of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, together with the representatives of the other Churches and Ecclesial Communities. I invite you to join our prayers spiritually.

Today it is also the memory of St. Francis of Sales, patron saint of journalists. Yesterday the Message for World Social Communications Day was released, entitled "Come and see. Communicating by meeting people where and how they are." I urge all journalists and communicators to "go and see", even where no one wants to go, and to bear witness to the truth.

I greet all of you who are connected through the media. A reminder and a prayer goes out to the families who are struggling most during this period. Take courage, let's move on! Let us pray for these families, and as far as possible be close to them. And I wish you all a good Sunday. Please don't forget to pray for me. Have a nice lunch and arrivederci!




Pope Francis Angelus 24.01.21

Time and Conversion

Pope Francis - Conversion, Time and Worldliness - Angelus 24.01.2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

This Sunday's Gospel passage (cf. Mk 1:14-20) shows us, so to speak, the “passing of the baton” from John the Baptist to Jesus. John was His precursor; he prepared the terrain for Him and prepared the way for Him: now Jesus can begin his mission and announce the salvation by now present; He was salvation. His preaching is summarized in these words: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent, and believe in the gospel” (v. 15). Simply. Jesus did not mince words. It is a message that invites us to reflect on two essential themes: time and conversion.

In this text of Mark the Evangelist, time is to be understood as the duration of the history of salvation worked by God; therefore, the time “fulfilled” is that in which this salvific action reaches its pinnacle, full realization: it is the historical moment in which God sent his Son into the world and his Kingdom is rendered more “close” than ever. The time of salvation is fulfilled because Jesus has arrived.

However, salvation is not automatic; salvation is a gift of love and as such offered to human freedom. Always, when we speak of love, we speak of freedom: a love without freedom is not love;  and being free it calls for a freely given response: it calls for our conversion. Thus, it means to change mentality – this is conversion, to change mentality – and to change life: to no longer follow the examples of the world but those of God, who is Jesus; to follow Jesus, as Jesus had done, and as Jesus taught us. It is a decisive change of view and attitude. In fact, sin – above all the sin of worldliness which is like air, it permeates everything – brought about a mentality that tends toward the affirmation of oneself against others and against God. It is difficult to express one's identity in the worldly spirit in positive terms and those of salvation: it is against oneself, against others and against God. And for this purpose it does not hesitate – the mentality of sin, the worldly mentality – to use deceit and violence. We see what happens with deceit and violence: greed, desire for power and not to serve, war, exploitation of people.... This is the mentality of deceit that definitely has its origins in the father of deceit, the great pretender, the devil. He is the father of lies, as Jesus defines him.

All this is opposed by the message of Jesus, who invites us to recognize ourselves as in need of God and his grace; to have a balanced attitude with regard to earthly goods; to be welcoming and humble toward others; to know and fulfil ourselves in the encounter with and service of others. For each one of us the time in which we are able to receive redemption is brief: it is the duration of our life in this world. It is brief. Perhaps it seems long.... I remember that I went to administer the Sacraments, the Anointing of the Sick to a very good elderly man, he told me this phrase: “My life flew by”. This is how we, the elderly, feel, that life has passed away. It passes away. And life is a gift of God's infinite love, but is also the time to prove our our love for Him. For this reason every moment, every instant of our existence is precious time to love God and to love our neighbour, and thereby enter into eternal life.

The history of our life has two rhythms: one, measurable, made of hours, days, years; the other, composed of the seasons of our development: birth, childhood, adolescence, maturity, old age, death. Every period, every phase has its own value, and can be a privileged moment of encounter with the Lord. Faith helps us to discover the spiritual significance of these periods: each one of them contains a particular call of the Lord, to which we can offer a positive or negative response. In the Gospel we see how Simon, Andrew, James and John responded: they were mature men; they had their work as fishermen, they had their family life.... Yet, when Jesus passed and called to them, “immediately they left their nets and followed him” (Mk 1:18).

Dear brothers and sisters, let us stay attentive and not let Jesus pass by without welcoming him. Saint Augustine said “I am afraid of God when he passes by”. Afraid of what? Of not recognizing Him, of not seeing Him, not welcoming Him.

May the Virgin Mary help us to live each day, each moment as the time of salvation, in which the Lord passes and calls us to follow him, every second of our life. And may she help us to convert from the mentality of the world, that of worldly reveries which are fireworks, to that of love and service.



Pope Francis Homily Holy Mass 24.01.21

Sunday of the Word of God

Pope Francis Homily - The Word of God Sunday - 24.01.2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

On this Sunday of the Word, let us listen to Jesus as he proclaims the Kingdom of God. Let us consider what he says and to whom he says it.

What does he say? Jesus begins his preaching with these words: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand” (Mk 1:15). God is near, that is the first message. His kingdom has come down to earth. God is not, as we are often tempted to think, distant, up in heaven, detached from the human condition. No, he is in our midst. The time of his distance ended when, in Jesus, he became man. Ever since then, God has been very close to us; he will never retire from our human condition or tire of it. This closeness is the very first message of the Gospel. If this was the opening theme and the refrain of all Jesus’ preaching, it must necessarily be the one constant of the Christian life and message. Before all else, we must believe and proclaim that God has drawn near to us, that we have been forgiven and shown mercy. Prior to every word of ours about God, there is his word to us, his Word who continues to tell us: “Do not be afraid, I am with you. I am at your side and I will always be there”.

The word of God enables us to touch this closeness. It is the antidote to our fear of having to face life alone. Indeed, by his word the Lord consoles us, that is, he stands “with” those who are “alone”. In speaking to us, he reminds us that he has taken us to heart, that we are precious in his eyes, and that he holds us in the palm of his hand. God’s word infuses this peace, but it does not leave us in peace. It is a word of consolation but also a call to conversion. “Repent”, says Jesus, immediately after proclaiming God’s closeness. For, thanks to his closeness, we can no longer distance ourselves from God and from others. The time when we could live thinking only of ourselves is now over. To do so is not Christian, for those who experience God’s closeness cannot ignore their neighbours or treat them with indifference. Those who hear God’s word are constantly reminded that life is not about shielding ourselves from others, but about encountering them in the name of God who is near. The word sown in the soil of our hearts, leads us in turn to sow hope through closeness to others. Even as God has done with us.

Let us now consider to whom Jesus speaks. His first words are to Galilean fishermen, simple folk who lived by harsh manual labour, by day and night. They were no experts in Scripture or people of great knowledge and culture. They lived in a region made up of various peoples, ethnic groups and cults: one that could not have been further from the religious purity of Jerusalem, the heart of the country. Yet that is where Jesus began, not from the centre but from the periphery, and he did so in order to tell us too that no one is far from God’s heart. Everyone can receive his word and encounter him in person. John received people in the desert, where only those able to leave their homes could go. Jesus, on the other hand, speaks of God in the heart of society, to everyone, wherever they find themselves. He does not speak at fixed times or places, but “walking along the shore”, to fishermen who were “casting their nets” (v. 16). He speaks to people in the most ordinary times and places. Here we see the universal power of the word of God to reach everyone and every area of life.

Yet the word of God also has particular power, that is, it can touch each person directly. The disciples would never forget the words they heard that day on the shore of the lake, by their boats, in the company of their family members and fellow workers: words that marked their lives forever. Jesus said to them: “Follow me, I will make you become fishers of men” (v. 17). He did not appeal to them using lofty words and ideas, but spoke to their lives. If he had told them: “Follow me, I will make you Apostles, you will be sent into the world to preach the Gospel in the power of the Spirit; you will be killed, but you will become saints”, we can be sure that Peter and Andrew would have answered: “Thanks, but we’ll stick to our nets and our boats!” But Jesus spoke to them in terms of their own livelihood: “You are fishermen, and you will become fishers of men”. Struck by those words, they come to realize that lowering their nets for fish was too little, whereas putting out into the deep in response to the word of Jesus was the secret of true joy. The Lord does the same with us: he looks for us where we are, he loves us as we are, and he patiently walks by our side. As he did with those fishermen, he waits for us on the shore of our life. With his word, he wants to change us, to invite us to live fuller lives and to put out into the deep together with him.

So dear brothers and sisters, let us not ignore God’s word. It is a love letter, written to us by the One who knows us best. In reading it, we again hear his voice, see his face and receive his Spirit. That word brings us close to God. Let us not keep it at arm’s length, but carry it with us always, in our pocket, on our phone. Let us give it a worthy place in our homes. Let us set the Gospel in a place where we can remember to open it daily, perhaps at the beginning and at the end of the day, so that amid all those words that ring in our ears, there may also be a few verses of the word of God that can touch our hearts. To be able to do this, let us ask the Lord for the strength to turn off the television and open the Bible, to turn off our cell phone and open the Gospel. During this liturgical year, we are reading Saint Mark, the simplest and the shortest of the Gospels. Why not read it at home too, even a brief passage each day. It will make us feel God’s closeness to us and fill us with courage as we make our way through life.






Pope Francis - Christ is Alive! 

Pope Francis - Christ is Alive

Christ is alive! He is our hope, and in a wonderful way he brings youth to our world, and everything he touches becomes young, new, full of life. The very first words, then, that I would like to say to every young Christian are these: Christ is alive and he wants you to be alive.
 

Pope Francis


100 inspiring Quotes from Pope Francis listed in Subject order with the date and occasion when the quote was made


Pope Francis Homily Second Vespers 25.01.2021  

Week of Prayer for Christian Unity

Pope Francis - Christian Unity Homily - Second Vespers - 25.01.2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

“Abide in my love” (Jn 15:9). Jesus links this request to the image of the vine and the branches. The Lord himself is the vine, who remains ever faithful in love, despite our sins and our divisions. Onto this vine, which is himself, all of us, the baptized, are grafted like branches. This means that we can grow and bear fruit only if we remain united to Jesus. Tonight let us consider this indispensable unity.
If our worship is genuine, we will grow in love for all those who follow Jesus, regardless of the Christian communion to which they may belong, for even though they may not be “one of ours”, they are his.




Second Vespers 25.01.21 
Conversion of Saint Paul 
54th Week of Prayer for Christian Unity

with Cardinal Kurt Koch. Due to a recurrence of sciatica Pope Francis will not be presiding over the Vespers




Holy Mass 24.01.21

Sunday of the Word of God

with Archbishop Rino Fisichella. Due to a recurrence of sciatica Pope Francis will not be presiding over the Mass 



Spiritual Communion: 
My Jesus, I believe that You are truly present in the Holy Sacrament. I love You above all things and I desire to receive You into my soul. Because I cannot at this moment receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as being already there and unite myself wholly to You. Never permit me to be separated from You. Amen.




Pope Francis Message for World Communications Day 23.01.2021

Pope Francis Message for World Communications Day 2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

The invitation to “come and see”, which was part of those first moving encounters of Jesus with the disciples, is also the method for all authentic human communication. In order to tell the truth of life that becomes history, it is necessary to move beyond the complacent attitude that we “already know” certain things. Instead, we need to go and see them for ourselves, to spend time with people, to listen to their stories and to confront reality, which always in some way surprises us. This year, then, I would like to devote this Message to the invitation to “come and see”, which can serve as an inspiration for all communication that strives to be clear and honest, in the press, on the internet, in the Church’s daily preaching and in political or social communication. 





Pope Francis General Audience 20.01.21

Prayer for Christian Unity

Pope Francis - Christian Unity - General Audience 20.01.2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above
In this catechesis, we will reflect on the prayer for Christian unity. In fact, the week of the 18th to the 25th of January is dedicated specifically to this – to ask God for the gift of unity to overcome the scandal of division between believers in Jesus. After the Last Supper, He prayed for His own, “that they may all be one” (Jn 17:21). This was His prayer before the Passion, we could call it His spiritual testament. Let us note, however, that the Lord did not command that His disciples be united. No, He prayed. He prayed to the Father for us, so that we might be one. This means that we are not able to achieve unity with our own strength. Above all, unity is a gift, it is a grace to be requested through prayer.

Each one of us needs it. In fact, we know that we are not capable of preserving unity even within ourselves. Many divisions surround us – between people, in families, in society, between nations and even between believers – and inside us. The solution to these divisions is not to oppose someone, because discord generates more discord. The true remedy begins by asking God for peace, reconciliation, unity.

And this is valid, first of all, for Christians. Unity can be achieved only as a fruit of prayer. Diplomatic efforts and academic dialogue are not enough. If we inspect the intentions for which we pray, we would probably realize that we have prayed little, perhaps never, for Christian unity. And yet, the world’s faith depends on it; in fact, the Lord asked that we be one “so that the world might believe” (Jn 17:21). The world will not believe because we will have convinced it with good arguments, but if we will have borne witness to that love that unites us and draws us near, yes: it will believe.

During this time of serious hardship, this prayer is even more necessary so that unity might prevail over conflicts. It is essential that Christians pursue the path toward full visible unity. In the last decades, thanks be to God, there have been many steps forward, but we still need to persevere in love and in prayer, without lacking trust or tiring.

To pray means to fight for unity. Yes, fight, because our enemy, the devil, is the one who divides, as the word itself says. Jesus asks the Holy Spirit for unity, to create unity. The devil always divides. He always divides because it is convenient for him to divide. He fosters division everywhere and in any way, while the Holy Spirit always joins in unity. In general, the devil does not tempt us with high theology, but with the weaknesses of our brothers and sisters. He is astute: he magnifies others’ mistakes and defects, sows discord, provokes criticism and creates factions. God has another way: He takes us as we are, He loves us so much, but He loves us as we are and takes us as we are; He takes those of us who are different, He takes sinners, and He always nudges us towards unity. We can evaluate ourselves and ask ourselves if, in the places in which we live, we nurture conflict or fight for an increase of unity with the tools that God has given us: prayer and love. What fuels conflict, instead, is gossip, always talking behind peoples’ backs. Gossip is the most handy weapon the devil has to divide the Christian community, to divide families, to divide friends, to always divide. The Holy Spirit always inspires unity.

The theme of this Week of Prayer specifically regards love: “Abide in my love and you shall bear much fruit” (see Jn 15:5-9). The root of communion and love is Christ who makes us overcome our prejudices to see in others a brother or sister to be loved always. Then we will discover that the Christians of other confessions – with their traditions, with their history – are gifts from God, they are gifts present within the territories of our diocesan and parish communities. Let us begin to pray for them and, when possible, with them. We will thus learn to love and appreciate them. Prayer, the Council reminds us, is the soul of every ecumenical movement (see Unitatis redintegratio, 8). Therefore, may prayer be the starting point to help Jesus make His dream come true: that they all may be one. Thank you.





Pope Francis January 2021

At the service of Human Fraternity

When we pray to God following Jesus, we come together as brothers and sisters with those who pray according to other cultures, other traditions and other beliefs.
We are brothers and sisters who pray.
Fraternity leads us to open ourselves to the Father of all and to see in the other a brother or sister, to share our lives or to support, to love, and to know each other.
The Church values God’s action in other religions, without forgetting that for us Christians, the wellspring of human dignity and fraternity, is in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
We believers must return to our sources and concentrate on what is essential. What is essential to our faith is the adoration of God and love of neighbour.
Let us pray that the Lord may give us the grace to live in full fellowship with our brothers and sisters of other religions and not fight each other, and praying for one another, open ourselves to all.





Pope Francis Message for 54th World Day of Peace 01.01.2021

A CULTURE OF CARE AS A PATH TO PEACE
Peace
For the full transcript click on the picture link above





















Subject Index
of Homilies


The Gospel in your pocket 

Read the Gospel

How do we receive the Word of God? The response is clear: As one receives Jesus Christ. The Church tells us that Jesus is present in the Scripture, in His Word.
Always carry a small Gospel with you in your purse, in your pocket, and read a passage from the Gospel during the day. Not so much to learn something, but mostly to find Jesus, because Jesus actually is in His Word, in His Gospel.  Every time I read the Gospel, I find Jesus.  - Pope Francis 01.09.14
 
Daily Readings - read the entire New Testament over a 2 year period (reading plan courtesy of Gideon International)



Pope Francis Angelus 17.01.2021

Encounter with Jesus

Pope Francis Encounters with Jesus and God's Calls - Angelus  17.01.2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

The Gospel for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time (see Jn 1:35-42) presents the meeting between Jesus and His first disciples. The scene unfolds along the Jordan River the day after Jesus’s baptism. It is John the Baptist himself who points out the Messiah to the two with these words: “Behold, the Lamb of God!”. And those two, trusting the Baptist’s testimony, follow Jesus. He realizes this and asks: “What are you looking for?”, and they ask Him: “Rabbi, where are you staying?”.

Jesus does not respond: “I live in Capernaum, or in Nazareth”, but says: “Come and you will see”. Not a calling card, but an invitation for an encounter. The two follow Him and remained that afternoon with Him. It is not difficult to imagine them seated asking Him questions and above all listening to Him, feeling their hearts enflamed ever more while the Master speaks. They sense the beauty of the words that respond to their greatest hope. And all of a sudden they discover that, even though it is evening, in their hearts, that light that only God can give was exploding within them. One thing that catches our attention: sixty years later, or maybe more, one of them would write in his Gospel: “it was about four in the afternoon” – he wrote the time. And this is one thing that makes us think: every authentic encounter with Jesus remains alive in the memory, it is never forgotten. You forget many encounters, but a true encounter with Jesus remains forever. And many years later, those two even remembered the time, they had not forgotten that encounter that was so happy, so complete, that it changed their lives. Then, when they leave from that meeting and return to their brothers, that joy, that light overflows from their hearts like a raging river. One of the two, Andrew, says to his brother, Simon – whom Jesus will call Peter when He will meet him – “We have found the Messiah” (v. 41). They left sure that Jesus was the Messiah, certain.

Let us pause a moment on this experience of meeting Christ who calls us to remain with Him. Each one of God’s calls is an initiative of His love. He is the one who always takes the initiative. He calls you. God calls to life, He calls to faith, and He calls to a particular state in life: “I want you here”. God’s first call is to life, through which He makes us persons; it is an individual call because God does not make things in series. Then God calls us to faith and to become part of His family as children of God. Lastly, God calls us to a particular state in life: to give of ourselves on the path of matrimony, or that of the priesthood or the consecrated life. They are different ways of realizing God’s design that He has for each one of us that is always a design of love. But God calls always. And the greatest joy for every believer is to respond to that call, offering one’s entire being to the service of God and the brothers and sisters.

Brothers and sisters, before the Lord’s call, which reaches us in a thousand ways – through others, happy or sad events – our attitude at times might be rejection. No… “I am afraid”… Rejection because it seems to be in contrast to our aspirations; and even fear because we believe it is too demanding and uncomfortable: “Oh no, I will never be able to do it, better not to, a calmer life is better… God over there, me here”. But God’s call is always love: we need to try to discover the love behind each call, and it should be responded to only with love. This is the language: the response to a call that comes out of love, only love. At the beginning there is an encounter, or rather, there is the encounter with Jesus who speaks to us of His Father, He makes His love known to us. And then the spontaneous desire will arise even in us to communicate it to the people that we love: “I met Love”, “I met the Messiah”, “I met Jesus”, “I found the meaning of my life”. In a word: “I found God”.

May the Virgin Mary help us make of our lives a hymn of praise to God in response to His call and in the humble and joyful fulfilment of His will.

But let us remember this: there was a moment for each one of us, in his or her life, in which God made Himself present more strongly, with a call. Let us remember that. Let us go back to that moment so that the memory of that moment might always renew that encounter with Jesus for us.



Pope Francis General Audience 13.01.21

The Prayer of Praise

Pope Francis - Prayer and Praise - General Audience 13.01.2021
Excerpt below, for the full transcript click on the picture link above

Let us continue our catechesis on prayer, and today we will give space to the dimension of praise.

We will take as our starting point a critical passage in the life of Jesus. After the first miracles and the involvement of the disciples in the proclamation of the Kingdom of God, the mission of the Messiah goes through a crisis. John the Baptist doubts and makes Him receive this message - John is in jail: “Are you he who is to come, or shall we look for another?” (Mt 11:3), because he feels this anguish of not knowing whether he is mistaken in his proclamation. There are always dark moments, moments of spiritual night-time, and John is going through this moment. There is hostility in the villages along the lake, where Jesus had performed so many prodigious signs (see Mt 11:20-24). Now, precisely in this disappointing moment, Matthew relates a truly surprising fact: Jesus does not lift up a lament to the Father, but rather He raises a hymn of jubilation: “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth”, says Jesus, "that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to babes” (Mt 11:25). So, in the midst of a crisis, amid the darkness of the soul of so many people, such as John the Baptist, Jesus blesses the Father, Jesus praises the Father. But why?

First and foremost, He praises Him for who He is: “Father, Lord of heaven and earth”. Jesus rejoices in His spirit because He knows and He feels that His Father is the God of the Universe, and vice versa, the Lord of all that exists is Father “My Father”. Praise springs from this experience of feeling that He is “Son of the Most High”. Jesus feels he is Son of the Most High.

And then Jesus praises the Father for favouring the little ones. It is what He Himself experiences, preaching in the villages: the “learned” and the “wise” remain suspicious and closed, who are calculating; while the “little ones” open themselves and welcome His message. This can only be the will of the Father, and Jesus rejoices in this. We too must rejoice and praise God because humble and simple people welcome the Gospel. People who perhaps lack many things but whose humility leads them to praise God. Those who do not consider themselves better than others, who are aware of their own limitations and their sins, who do not want to lord it over others, who, in God the Father, recognise that we are all brothers and sisters.

His prayer also leads us, the readers of the Gospel, to judge our personal defeats in a different way, to judge differently the situations in which we do not see clearly the presence and action of God, when it seems that evil prevails and there is no way to stop it. In those moments Jesus, who highly recommended the prayer of asking questions, at the very moment when He would have had reason to ask the Father for explanations, instead begins to praise Him. It seems to be a contradiction, but it is there, it is the truth.

To whom is praise helpful? To us or to God? A text of the Eucharistic liturgy invites us to pray to God in this way, it says this: “Although you have no need of our praise, yet our thanksgiving is itself your gift, since our praises add nothing to your greatness, but profit us for salvation” (Roman Missal, Common Preface IV). By giving praise, we are saved.

The prayer of praise serves us. Paradoxically it must be practised not only when life fills us with happiness, but above all in difficult moments, in moments of darkness when the path becomes an uphill climb. We learn that, through that ascent, that difficult path, that wearisome path, those demanding passages, we get to see a new panorama, a broader horizon. Giving praise is like breathing pure oxygen: it purifies the soul, it makes you look far ahead so as not to remain imprisoned in the difficult moment, in the darkness of difficulty.

Saint Francis at the end of his life, was by then almost blind, and he felt in his soul the weight of a solitude he had never before experienced: the world had not changed since the beginning of his preaching, there were still those who let themselves be torn apart by quarrels, and in addition he was aware that death was approaching ever nearer. It could have been the moment of disillusionment, of that extreme disillusionment and the perception of his own failure. But Francis prayed at that instant of sadness, in that dark instant: “All praise is yours, my Lord”. He prays by giving praise. Francis praises God for everything, for all the gifts of creation, and even for death, which he courageously calls “sister”. These examples of saints, of Christians, and also of Jesus, of praising God in difficult moments, open to us the gates of a great road towards the Lord, and always purifies us. Praise always purifies.

The Saints show us that we can always give praise, in good times and bad, because God is the faithful Friend. This is the foundation of praise: God is the faithful friend, and His love never fails. He is always beside us, He always awaits us. It has been said, “He is the sentinel who is close to you and keeps you going with confidence”. In difficult and dark moments, let us have the courage to say: “Blessed are you, O Lord”. Praising the Lord. This will do us so much good. Thank you.



https://sites.google.com/site/francishomilies/home/the%20Holy%20Rosary.png



Fratelli Tutti 

Fraternity / Fratelli Tutti

Fratelli Tutti on fraternity and social friendship.
The signs of the times clearly show that human fraternity and care of creation form the sole way towards integral development and peace.
May Saint Francis accompany the Church’s path of fraternity, among believers of every religion, and among all peoples.




24 May 2020 to 24 May 2021

All of us can co-operate as instruments of God for the care of creation, each according to his or her own culture, experience, involvements and talents.

https://sites.google.com/site/francishomilies/home/Laudato%20Si%20Year%205.jpg

The encyclical Laudato Si' tried to draw attention to the cry of the Earth and the poor. Thanks to the initiative of the Department for the Service of Integral Human Development, the "Laudato week" will blossom into a special anniversary year of Laudato Si', a special year to reflect on the encyclical, from May 24 of this year until May 24 of next year. I invite all people of good will to join in, and to take care of our common home and our frail brothers and sisters.




 AE 

Abortion

Accusers

Acts of mercy

Adultery

Advent

Adversary

Afraid

Agreement

All Nations

All Saints

All Souls

Alone

Always beside us

Among the people

Anger

Annoyed

Annunciation of the Lord

Anointing

antichrist

Anxiety

Apostle

Apostolic zeal

Arrogance

Ascension

Ash Wednesday

Ashamed

Ask

Asylum seekers

Authority 

Bad Times

Baptism

Baptism of the Lord

Beatitudes

Beauty

Belittling

Belonging

Betrayal

Birth of Jesus

Bishops

Black

Bleakest moments

Bless

Body and Blood

Born Christians

Broadmindedness

Building

Bullying

Burdens

Busy 

Call to Holiness - Gaudete Exsultate

Canonization

Care

Care for our common home / Laudato Si / Climate Change

Careers

Catechists

Catechumen

Catholic

 Celebration

Change your Life

Charity

Children

Choices in Life

Chrism Mass

Christ the King

Christian community

Christian Life

Christian Unity

Christian vigilance

Christian Witness

Christianity as a social habit

Christians of action and truth

Christians of words

Christmas

Church

Cleaner

Clerical attitude

Closed door Church

Closeness

Come out of ourselves

Comfort

Commandments

Communication

Communion

Comparison to others constantly

Compassion

Complaining

Concreteness

Condemnation

Confession

Confirmation

Conflict

Confraternities

Conscience

Consecrated Life

Consolation

Consumerism

Consumption

Contemplative Prayer

Contempt

Conversion

Corpus Christie

Correction

Corruption

Courage

Covenant

Cowardice

Creation

Crisis

Cross

Crucifix

Cry Out

Culture of Waste

Cursing


Dark Times

Darkness

Deacons

Death

Deception

Deeds

Defeat

Defending ourselves

Demons

Desires

Desolation

Despair

Destruction

Devastation

Devil

Dictatorial Governments

Difficulties

Disabled

Disappointment

Discarding

Discernment

Disciple

Discouraged

Discrediting

Disdain

Distances

Disunity

Division

Docility

Drugs 

Easter

Ecclesial spirit

Economics

Ecumenism

Education

Elderly

Encounter with Jesus

End of the world

Endurance

Enemies

Environment

Envy

Epiphany

Ethics

Eucharist

Evangelical spirit

Evangelii Gaudium

Evangelization

Everyone

Evil

Excluded

Exorcism

Expectation

Exploitation

J 

Face of God

 Failures

Faith

Faithfulness

False accusation

False News

Fame

Family

Fasting

Fat

Father

Fear

First Communicants

Flattery

Flee from God

Following

Forbear

Forgiveness

the Forgotten

Fortune telling

Fratelli Tutti

Fraternity / Fratelli Tutti / All Brothers and Sisters

Freedom

Future

 Gardener

Generosity

Gentleness

Give freely

Give Thanks to God

Go out

God calls

Godliness

God Remembers You

God's Gratuitousness

God's Love

God's Patience

God's Power and Weakness

God's True Face

God's Voice

God walks with us

Good

Good Deeds

Good Friday

Good Samaritan

Good Shepherd

Gossip

Government

Grace

Greatest

Grey

Grief

Guardian Angels

Harmony 

Hatred

Heal this wound

Healing

Healthy Restlessness

Hear the voice of God

Heart of stone

our Heart

Heaven

Hell

Help me

Help one another

Holiness

Holy Family

Holy Saturday

Holy Spirit

Holy Thursday

Holy Wednesday

Holy Week

Homeless

Hope

Hospitality

How to know God

Human Dignity

Human Fraternity

Human Trafficking

Humiliation

Humility

Hungry

Hypocrisy of the just

Hypocrites

Idle 

Idols

Impatient

the Important

Indifference

Indignation

In my name

Insecurity

Insults

Jealousy

Jesus Christ

Journeying

Joy

Joy of the Gospel/ Evangelii Gaudium

Judas

Judging

Justice 

 Killing

Kindness

Kingdom of God

Lamentations

Last Judgement

Laudato Si

the Law

Lazarus

Lazy

Leaders

the Least Ones

Leave something

Lent

Liberation

Lies

Life

Lift up our eyes

Light

Listen to the word of Jesus

Littleness

Living stones

Lord's Supper

Lost Faith

Lost sheep

Love

Love God

Love in the Family - Amoris Laetitia

Love of God

Love our neighbour

Lukewarm Christians

Lumen Fidei /The light of Faith 

Lust

Luxury

 

 Magnanimity

Marginalized

Marriage

Martyrs

Mary

Mass of the Lord's Supper

Material things

Mediocrity

Meekness

Memory

Mercy

Migrants

Ministry

Miracles

Misinformation

Mission

Missionary spirit

Mistreat

Mock

Moments of Desolation

Money

Mourning

Mud-slinging

Murmuring

My Image

My Lifestyle


Nativity Scene

Near to people

Neighbour

New life

Newness

New things of God

Night of the sinner

Nostalgia

Not speaking

 

Obey God

Omission

Open door Church

Oppressed

Our Lady 

Overwhelmed

 S T

Pagan worship

Palm Sunday - Passion of the Lord

Past

Pastors

Pastoral Customs Office

Path of Life

Patience

Peace

Pentecost / Whitsunday

People of God

Persecution

Perseverance

Personal success

Pessimism

Please May I

Pleasure

Politics

Poor

Poor in Spirit

Possessions

Power

Praise

Prayer

Present

Presentation of the Lord

Pride

Priests

Prince of the World

Prisoners

Privilege

Problems

Proclaim the Gospel

Proclamation 

Prodigal Son

Professing

Profession of Faith

Profit

Promotion

Prophecy

Prophet

Prostitutes

Protect

 

Read the Gospel

Reassurance 

Receiving

Reconciliation

Refugees

Refusing Jesus

Regret

Remain

Remain steadfast in the Lord

Remember

Renewal

Repent

Resentment

Respect

Resurrection

Retaliation

Return to God

Revenge

Riches

Ridicule

Rifts

Righteousness

Rigid Christians

Rivalry

Ruins of Life

Rule for Daily Life

Rulers


Sacred Heart

Sadness

Saint

Salt

Salvation

Sanctification

Satan

Scorn

Seduction

See

See the Good

Seeking God

Self-importance

Self-justification 

Selfish

Separation

Serenity

Service

Setbacks

Settle the matter

Shame

Sharing

Shouting

Sick

Silence

Simplicity

Sin

Slander

Slavery

Smallness

Smiling

Solidarity

Something Stupid

Son

Sorry

Soul

St John

St Joseph

St Mark

St Paul

St Peter

St Stephen

Stifling Life

Stop and Choose

Strength

Struggle

Subsidiarity

Success

Suffering

Surprises

Swearing

Swim against the tide

Take life as it comes

Talents

Talk to the Lord

Tarot cards

Tears

Temple

Temptations 

Tenderness

Thank You

Thanksgiving

Thoughts

Time

Today

Tragedies

Transfiguration

Trials of Life

Treasure

Trinity

Triumphalism

Troubles

Trust in God

Truth

 XY Z 

Urbi et Orbi

 Uncertainty

Unemployed

Unity

Vanity

Verbal abuse

Victims

Victory

Vigilance

Violence 

Wants

Wars

Weakest

Weakness

Wealth

Weary

Weeping

Welcoming

Well-being

Witness

 Women

Word of God

Words

Work

Works of charity

Works of mercy

World institutions

Worldliness

Worship

Worries

Wounds

Wrongdoing endured

 

Young people